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Discussion Starter #1
As for the brakes...mine do not feel as good as I would like them to so I am wondering a few things

a) How hard is it for someone who is not that great at mechanical things to change the brake pads/brake lines
b) How much of a effect would upgrading the brake pads have on the braking amount
c) I've heard that it's not worth it to get steel brake lines? True or not so true?
d) Is it safe to do for a noobie like me?

Any information you can give me would be great. My bike is a 96'
 

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a) I've changed brake lines before, It's not hard, the only real hard part is bleeding the lines to make sure that there isn't any air in them.
b) For regular street riding you won't notice a difference if you change the brake lines, pads you might depending on the pad, be careful though there are some pads out there that need to be warmed up before they are effective so don't go with to much of a race brake pad
c) The steel braided lines prevent the line from expanding therefore increasing the amount of pressure needed to stop, the expansion of the brake lines is caused by excessive heat that is transfered to the brake fluid, if you race or ride really hard on the street it might be worth it to you.
d) It is quite safe, if you know how. If you are doing just the pads its pretty easy to do. If you are going to go deeper into the brake system have a qualified tech give you a hand and look over your work.


The smart thing to do is to only change one brake and see how you did, this way you still have the other brake to rely on if you screwed up. After you finish do a test run, just go up and down your street when there is no traffic around, don't go faster than idle your first attempt at braking and go a little fast each attempt. If your brakes don't quit working after the first 10 or so back to back hard brakes then most likely you are good to go.

I would say that if your brakes are still in good shape leave them as is. When it comes time to replace the pads upgrade then. The stock ex brakes are pretty decent for a single rotor setup. Start out by changing the pads, if you still feel like you need more braking power (and you are riding on the street) then slow down you don't need to be going that fast.

I've been tought how to do it and it's not hard, but for the most part the brakes I leave to a qualified mechanic (aka my friend Randy) and I just go and help out (aka be his ***** while he does the work).

Good luck, and if you do it and don't feel comfortable take the bike to a qualified tech and have them look it over.
 

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its really not TOO hard to change brake pads, nor lines on this bike. I have sintered pads on the front wheel, along with a Galfer braided stainless line. the sintered pads helped a bit, but the stainless line made a bigger difference to me than the pads alone. wasnt too bad to do either one.

just make sure you keep the reservoir up top full when bleeding the brake line after installing the stainless one. probably wouldnt hurt to change out the fluid through the whole system front and rear even if you arent replacing the brake lines themselves.
 

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derf said:
If your brakes don't quit working after the first 10 or so back to back hard brakes then most likely you are good to go.
careful not to work the new pads to hard for the first 100 miles. ie, dont go out and slam the brakes! Much like tires, clutchs, etc..you need to break them in a bit. be careful.

brakes aren't hard, but its not something you wanna take with "i think i can work thru it" approach. Your brakes are what stops you (duh..), and there is no room for error. if you have even been traveling at speed, and hit the brakes and get nothing, it is a VERY bad feeling, not one i recommend.
 

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I just wrote this for another forum, and being too lazy to do it again I cut and pasted it.
FOG


OK Johnny,
And anybody else whose interested. Bleeding the brakes is a simpleoperationn, aimed at removing any air from the system. The air is compressable as the Brake fluid is not and it's presence in the system will give the brakes a spongy feel or cause them to not work at all.

There are a variety of conditions to consider depending on what you have already done (or not done) so I jst discribe a complete re filling of a empty system.

I never use any gadjets for this, Myty vac or whatever.

Open the top of the master Cylinder or the cap off the resivoiur, fill it with fresh fluid from a clean source.

Try pumping the hand lever, with the bleeder valve on the caliper open. If you feel some resistance, that's good as it means the MC in not airbound. No resistance: This indicates there is air in the MC piston or check valve and it cannot operate with air, the piston displacement is very small and it cannot force the air all the way down the line.
Loosen the connection of the line at the MC and pump the lever till fluid squirts out. Tighten the connection and continue to pump fluid down to the caliper till it runs out of the bleeder nipplConstantlyantlly refill the MC resivoiur, if you let it get low you mau introduce new air into the system and you'll be back to square one.
OK now we have a full system. Close the bleeder valve and pump the lever to build up pressure. momentarilyrilly crack the bleeder valve to release that pressure, The close the Bleeder as soon as the hand lever reaches the bar. What came out? AIr? FLuid? Repeat untill clear fluid only is released.

That's the basic method, there are several other variants but all have the same basic steps.

If you sure you have removed the air and still have a soft brake. You may have a warped disc or other mechanical problems.

FOG
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks everyone.

I have bleed the brakes within the past 2 months (with some help). I will most likely wear the pads out and then upgrade them.

Thanks again.
 
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