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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
For me, it's an impact wrench.

Never had much in the way of air tool beyond paint guns and tire inflators. I inherited this impact wrench from my dad, and whilst I don't use it a tremendous amount, when I do, it usually saves the day.

That latest time was today, removing the big a$$ rear nut on my VFR800. A whopping 46mm (1-13/16" for you imperial folks). Quite the beast to remove using hand power alone. Check the VFR forums for all the stories of strife.

A had to order my impact socket, as no-one stocks these large sizes on the shelf in my area. After un-staking the nut, it probably took a max of 30 seconds to get the nut off, and with no more effort than pulling a trigger. You simply cannot beat an impact wrench to removing stubborn nuts, especially those that are atteched to mechanisms that like to rotate (i.e. wheels, clutch mechanisms, etc).

Here is the big-a$$ socket on the gun....

52788





....and here is the easily defeated big-a$$ nut. :D


52789
 

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for me....welding equipment. Sorry I never learned.
 

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52792
As a young Toolmaker I could never afford the top line toolbox from Gerstner, even in later years when I owned the company I still never bought one. Now that I'm retired and don't need one I decided to make one for myself.
Kinda proud of it too
FOG
 

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I used to be a Master certified ASE auto tech, I have more tools than God, but being in Florida nothing ever rusted, so I never needed to weld. Recently bought a welder and have begun practicing with it since there have been a few brackets and pieces I've needed to make for various projects.

Also, cordless impacts are a godsend. Just replaced valve cover gaskets on my Ram 1500 Hemi and my cordless 3/8" impact ratchet made the work so quick.
 

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For me, it's an impact wrench.

Never had much in the way of air tool beyond paint guns and tire inflators. I inherited this impact wrench from my dad, and whilst I don't use it a tremendous amount, when I do, it usually saves the day.

That latest time was today, removing the big a$$ rear nut on my VFR800. A whopping 46mm (1-13/16" for you imperial folks). Quite the beast to remove using hand power alone. Check the VFR forums for all the stories of strife.

A had to order my impact socket, as no-one stocks these large sizes on the shelf in my area. After un-staking the nut, it probably took a max of 30 seconds to get the nut off, and with no more effort than pulling a trigger. You simply cannot beat an impact wrench to removing stubborn nuts, especially those that are atteched to mechanisms that like to rotate (i.e. wheels, clutch mechanisms, etc).

Here is the big-a$$ socket on the gun....

View attachment 52788




....and here is the easily defeated big-a$$ nut. :D


View attachment 52789
For me, it's an impact wrench.

Never had much in the way of air tool beyond paint guns and tire inflators. I inherited this impact wrench from my dad, and whilst I don't use it a tremendous amount, when I do, it usually saves the day.

That latest time was today, removing the big a$$ rear nut on my VFR800. A whopping 46mm (1-13/16" for you imperial folks). Quite the beast to remove using hand power alone. Check the VFR forums for all the stories of strife.

A had to order my impact socket, as no-one stocks these large sizes on the shelf in my area. After un-staking the nut, it probably took a max of 30 seconds to get the nut off, and with no more effort than pulling a trigger. You simply cannot beat an impact wrench to removing stubborn nuts, especially those that are atteched to mechanisms that like to rotate (i.e. wheels, clutch mechanisms, etc).

Here is the big-a$$ socket on the gun....

View attachment 52788




....and here is the easily defeated big-a$$ nut. :D
On my personal bikes, have two of these, I break out my long 1/2 inch breaker bar and go at them like that. No air tools for my personal bikes. I had to change the rear rotor on my 93 VFR and remember using this method. Trying to think if I had to remove that nut on my 91. I know I re-torqued the nut on my 91 with my 1/2 inch Snap On torque instrument. I would eat a vegan quiche and not have wine with it either. LOL
 

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Thank you , had to borrow a table saw and a planer, the design is mine, and
I just pretended it was made out of alumunium.
Fog
 

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There are still a lot of tools I wish I had but don’t. As far as ones I have and wish I bought sooner, I have to go with my reversible ratcheting Metric and Standard wrenches. They are amazing for tight spaces and I often find myself using them even when a ratchet and socket would work.
 

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I have an electric impact gun. To tell the truth, the thing that seems to work more reliably for me, for stuck bolts, is a breaker bar. A long telescoping bar that holds sockets.

I use this every time I remove the rear wheel as well as change summer rims/tires for winter rims/tires on the car.
 

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I have an electric impact gun. To tell the truth, the thing that seems to work more reliably for me, for stuck bolts, is a breaker bar. A long telescoping bar that holds sockets.

I use this every time I remove the rear wheel as well as change summer rims/tires for winter rims/tires on the car.
You need to leave the "Great White North" and move to South Florida mannnn, of course that's when they open the boarder up! LoL.
 

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20201205_185826.jpg

No use for these funky ratchets on the EX. But they can come in handy on the modern cars and trucks that the manufacturers design for the purpose of teeing me off.
 

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ItemImage-303552-q5vpui-d8gb0w-9escmb.png




18V impact screwdriver. I've used these forever in construction but only recently started using one for automotive work. They're not good for large fasteners, obviously, but you'd be surprised how much torque they have and how useful they are. Many smaller fasteners that I spent my life using a ratchet or hand screwdriver on are zipped right off and on like a breeze. It's faster and more maneuverable than an air ratchet. You need to take care not blast things on and off too quickly or over torque but it's not an issue if you pay attention.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Add an Ultrasonic cleaner to the list. I've been wanting to get one for years, and always had an excuse not to spend the money. Finally bit the bullet, and bought the HF version on sale last week. It has good reviews across the internet, and is cheap enough to resell and not lose too much cash if I don't like it.

Ran the 250 carbs through the cleaner last night, and I'm liking the results so far. Used diluted Simple Green HD (purple version) to start with. The aluminum carb bodies came out spectacular. Didn't do as good a job on the brass pieces, so I still need to keep experimenting on what works best for those.

I used to do the PineSol soak for prior cleaning jobs, and that always yielded good results over time. Plus the delicate scrubbing and cleaning in the areas needing extra attention. Carb cleaner spray to make sure all the hidden passages are clear.
 
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For me the best thing I have added to my tools is the Motorcycle lift. Gotten too fluffy to roll around on the concrete anymore.
 

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After much consideration, I'd have to name my No Mar tire machine as the one thing I wish I'd added sooner. It sure beats the hell out of the 5 gal pail and spoons routine. Also, getting fluffier in my advancing age it means I don't have to bend over as much while changing a tire.

Getting a lift is nice but as I already had a maintenance bench, it isn't as big an impact as building the bench was. It does go taller though, and negates the need to use a ramp to get a bike on the bike bench.

As far as hand tools......I had most of what I have anyway as I used my tools in heavy equipment repair for a time. Not really any specific one that aided in maintaining any of my bikes...at least, until I got my 996. Then I started collecting Ducati specific tools.

I can't pin point any of them as more useful than the others because I can't use them on anything else but my Ducatis.....sean
 

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the problem with tools is you never have enough there is always one you need but haven't got. years ago that meant buying yet more gear to put into a draw you never might use again.
I started making my own tools years ago. sort of became a hobby on it's own. unless it was a complicated procedure to build then it meant buying the gear to make the tools. just to do the job, sort of a self defeating exercise.
end result a garage full of no space.
I think what I'm trying to say is, there isn't a particular tool I wish I had earlier but the space to store and use them all.

I started with a 8ft square shed and now have a 20ft x 30ft garage/work shop. even this at times seems a little crowded now.
 
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