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Discussion Starter #1
its always best to be prepared, and disaster always strikes when youre on the road. What is in your tool kit that you bring with you while on a ride? The real adventure begins once something goes wrong!

I have a basic set I started just in case, but wondering what others may also have that I should Add.

Allen keys 5, 6, 8 mm
wrenches and/or sockets (10, 12, 14, 17 mm)
screwdrivers (JIS)
Pliers
zip ties
 

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hi. I only have 2 items in my emergency kit. mobile phone. and vehicle recovery card. I do this for 2 reasons.
1. if somethings goes wrong. it will not usually be something one can fix with minimum tools.
2. when the recovery truck turns up. he will have a van full of tools I could not possibly carry on the bike.
just saying. British logic. :):):)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
True, in a true emergancy I am all with that line of thinking. However if for example someone knocks the bike over in a parking lot and I need to adjust the handlebar (I have clip ons) or some basic thing then I would much rather have a simple tool kit. I do have AAA and sometimes it takes a while for them to show up. I would like to at least feel like I can do something simple just in case.
 

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that being the case I would probably change every fixing on the bike (where possible) for the correct sized Allen bolts and just carry a set of keys in the pouch under the seat. BTW I gave up on the JIS screws a long time ago.
when the subject of tools comes up I am reminded of a mate years ago he carried a full tool kit in a back pack boasted he could strip the bike and put it back together at the side of the road. we were all impressed with this until he was knocked off the bike going to work. a screw driver in in bag somehow managed to stab him in the back puncturing his left lung. that was the day all my tools stayed in the garage and I joined a recovery service.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yikes! Yeah I have a small leather tool roll that my tools are in and those are not on my back but on the bike instead.

Hope be was ok, that's not a good story to hear.

FWIW I have seen several bags that have at least a neoprene of not a reinforced panel towards the rider to prevent such a thing like that happening. I thing Fortnine did a rundown of some of the bags like a year ago and warned against cheaper bags for just that purpose (and also lose loops on the sleeve on a jacket or glove that could get caught on the hydro tube clip)
 

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I used to always carry the factory tool kit under my seat. Until the strap that held it in place dry rotted out. I did whip into a Home Depot once to get zip ties, when I heard a strange sound and realized it was a wire that dropped down and was getting hit by the fan motor.
 

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its always best to be prepared, and disaster always strikes when youre on the road. What is in your tool kit that you bring with you while on a ride? The real adventure begins once something goes wrong!

I have a basic set I started just in case, but wondering what others may also have that I should Add.

Allen keys 5, 6, 8 mm
wrenches and/or sockets (10, 12, 14, 17 mm)
screwdrivers (JIS)
Pliers
zip ties

Allen key multi tool, tire pressure gauge, crescent wrench, pliers, cheap reversible screw driver, Glock 21 with 230 grain freedom ringers
 

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Flashlight. It always happens at night. Phones won't get in crevices so nice, and don't expect to hold them with your teeth either.
Shoelace or other length of string. For those jobs where zip-ties won't actually work and you need to lash stuff together.
That little telescopic extending magnet thing. For dropped screws, either in some unreachable part of the bike or somewhere on the ground, somewhere.
 

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Lots of good ideas here, but don't forget the foundation of any emergency repair kit....duct tape. If you've got a half used up roll out in the shop, you can squash it flat so it takes up way less room. Plus a few clean rags (I like the blue paper shop towels that come in a roll). And those two items aren't just for the bike. The combo will work on a banged up human until real first aid is available. (Don't ask me how I know.)
 

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I always want to be able to adjust the chain tension when I'm on a trip--so the wrenches for that, plus cotter pins, plus pliers.

can of chain lube

I always wanna be able to plug the tire if I pick up a nail--so those two tools int he tire repair kit, plus plugs (same pliers as above). plus tire gauge.

zip ties. To fasten the (damned) front fairing back together if I let the bike fall over on gravel, sand, etc.

wrenches/sockets/screwdriver to take off the (damned) front fairing in case I need to change the headlight bulb.

An assortment of bulbs (headlight, running lights, dash lights, etc), each wrapped in a paper towel, and kept together in a small tupperware.

I do carry the spark plug socket with me, though I have never yet needed it on the road, and the socket to take the tank off in case I need to get in there...
 

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Just the factory tools plus shop rags and zip ties for jaunts around town, where I have the ability to retrieve a stranded bike easily using my trailer.

On the road and away from home, I will add tire strings, a mini compressor, and chain lube (unless I'm on the GW :p ). All tools are carried on the bike and never on me. I don't want the extra weight on my shoulders, or the possibility of possibly landing on them in an "off".
 

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Waiting for towing sounds alright, but if you want to be able to drive home on a damaged bike,
I suggest keeping a few main fuses and a jumper wire to bypass the ignition switch.
Very common for even a light crash to take out the ignition switch and blow the fuse.

Wait for a ride, or fix on the fly, your choice.
 

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Hmmmmm, this post has me thinking about my priorities. Having been a boy scout, I keep in my car a full set of box ends and sockets, needle nose, a jug of oil, jumper cables, channel locks, one of those magical orange 6-way screwdrivers, rags, duct tape, string, rope, ratchet straps, some assorted wire/terminals/fuses, a warning triangle, a ground cover/blanket, a couple of bulbs, a poncho, a headlamp, a partridge, and a pear tree. Of course, when my alternator blew 2 hours from home my dad had to come rescue me despite all that, but that's beside the point...

On my bike though I only carry the stock toolkit, a drawstring bag, and a chunk of plywood for the kickstand, maybe I should at least add a set of Allen keys or something... Does everyone keep their stuff in the little taillight compartment or are there other good hidey holes around the bike? I can never seem to get anything to fit nicely directly under the seat...
 

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yeah I guess a lot depends on where you are here the roadside assistance is very good. years ago I carried enough spares and tools in the car to do most jobs at the side of the road. never had to use them. the only time it did break down. it wasn't fixable. so got towed anyway.
the bikes a bit different it isn't really designed for roadside repairs. you can't get to the plugs without removing the tank and most other stuff requires a partial strip down. on the old bikes most parts were accessible without even taking the seat off.
 

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I carry the factory toolkit in a nice heavy nylon fabric bag, which I store on top of the battery. (I replaced the useless mechanics pliers with a #5 Vise Grip.) I also carry a folding 1/4 T-handle with 8, 10, 12 and 14 mm sockets, 5 and 6 mm Allen sockets and #2 and #3 JIS bits, and a flat bit. I also carry a quart bag with a number of shop towels, pairs of nitrile gloves and zip ties; these last two I strap in place in the taillight compartment. I have several hook-and-loop strips wound around the frame under the seat, which I can use to strap in place assorted things. I also always carry a 2-piece yellow raincoat in my tank bag. I will be adding a tire plugs and a small pump as soon as I can get a rack and a top box.

I found out the hard way that you cannot put anything between the seat and the fender, as the fender can pop out of its tracks and rub on the tire.

I've ridden this particular bike for 7K miles so far and have not had a breakdown, but the tools do see use when I do maintenance.
 
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