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Discussion Starter #1
My bike has issues starting until I pull the plugs and crank her a few times, and then she starts. Sounds like a flooded engine right? But with the plugs off and the engine cranking, no fuel spews out and there's barely a hint of gasoline. Reconnect everything and she runs fine. Stop the engine and I have difficulties starting her up again. Could it be bad plugs?

Also, what's the sign the engine is flooded. In cars, the smell of fuel or the tone of the engine gives it away. Help please. This bike is annoying me now. I just want to fix these problems and get rid of it.
 

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Maybe the spark is going elsewhere. Clean the insides of the plug boots.

FOG
 

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Discussion Starter #5
FOG said:
Maybe the spark is going elsewhere. Clean the insides of the plug boots.

FOG
Boots are fine. I put new plugs in and with the tank off, I used a turkey baster to feed it fuel. While there was lots of fuel, the bike ran nicely. When I put the tank back on, it stopped running. So I think the petcock is fucked again. I've done everything I can do with the carb already. Now time to move on.

I just got some new o-rings for the petcock and they are MUCH MUCH bigger than its seat. So I'm not sure if they're the right o-rings, but the part numbers match up with the microfiche.

If I made myself a new petcock using off the shelf plumbing hardware that is not vacuum actuated, would it work? Is the flow rate of the petcock important? Drip drip versus pee stream?
 

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Fuel flow is important thru the petcock. Inadequate flow will show up as poor performance as you open the throttle wider. What shape is your tank in on the inside? Is there much visible rust? If so and you think the petcock is clogging you need to clean out the fuel tank, clean the petcock, install an inline fuel filter, and seal the inside of the tank with a sealer like Kreem. Whatever sealer you use be sure to follow the instructions to the letter or you will have more clogging. The sealer must dry completely.

One other thing - is the vacuum line from the carbs to the petcock hooked up correctly and in good shape, no holes, cracks, etc?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Problem fixed. There was a very tiny piece of rubber inside the float valve seat. That caused the engine to flood, but not all the time. Once I got rid of it and installed an inline fuel filter from a Briggs & Stratton lawn mower, everything is all peachy.

Thanks for everybody's help. I still hate carburetors btw, but I will let it slide THIS time. :p
 

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donkeyman said:
Problem fixed. There was a very tiny piece of rubber inside the float valve seat. That caused the engine to flood, but not all the time. Once I got rid of it and installed an inline fuel filter from a Briggs & Stratton lawn mower, everything is all peachy.

Thanks for everybody's help. I still hate carburetors btw, but I will let it slide THIS time. :p
You won't believe how common this is. I have gone so far as to predict that a person would find such a thing. (I didn't in this case, but I thought of it) The rubber line and the sharp edge of the petcock nipple is the source. As you wiggle the hose on after taking off the tank. you sheared that piece off the inside of the fuel line. It then floated to the float valve wher it either Blocks open the valve or prevents it from opening.
I automatically replace that rubber line with a Neoprene one and always fit a in line filted before any fuel is allowed to flow into just cleaned carbs.

FOG
 
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