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Discussion Starter #1
I just finished installing the Woodcraft rearsets that I got for Christmas. I thought I'd post my opinions of everything and the installation.
I'll preface this by saying that I do trackdays, but no racing. I didn't get these because I thought I needed them, I just thought they looked better than stock and would give the bike a more sporty feel.

1. The quality of the rearsets is fantastic! They are milled from 6061 T6 aluminum and look beautiful!
2. The large return spring that is used on the stock brackets either has to be discarded or you have to rig it up yourself. It is not a necessary part and because the rearsets are designed for racing it wasn't incorporated into the design. If you look at the picture you can see where I attached it. This required bending the spring a little bit where I have it attached. Another option would be to drill and tap a hole on the backside of the bracket for a screw that you could attach the spring to.
3. Because of the race application, the stock brake light switch cannot be used. If you will be riding the bike on the street you must either jerry rig the stock one, or buy a special switch from Woodcraft. The switch replaces the banjo bolt on the top of the master cylinder and activates the brake by sensing the pressure of the brake fluid in the system. Since I don't like jerry rigging stuff I went with this option.
4. I had to shorten the brake line from the brake fluid reservoir to the master cylinder by about 2.5" inches and reroute it through a hole I had to cut in the plastic fender. The bracket moved the master cylinder pretty far back and the way the stock brake line was created a 90 degree bend. You can see this strange bend in the second picture.
5. The longer shift rod requires you to cut up you sprocket cover. The only way to keep the cover and not cut it is to switch to a reverse shift pattern. You keep the stock shift rod but have to buy a new shift pedal. I opted to just leave the cover off.
6. The kickstand interferes with the shifter. I adjusted it enough that it really isn't a problem, but the placement of the shifter is limited without modifying or removing the side stand.

Overall I am very happy. The install wasn't as straight forward as I liked, but it wasn't difficult just time consuming. The location of the pegs is a lot better IMHO. I'm 6' and I don't feel as cramped even though the pegs were moved up 1". Also when I'm sitting on the bike with my legs down the pegs are out of the way. Would I recommend them? Absolutely, but I dont' know if I would have bought them with my own money. They are pretty expensive for what adds up to a cosmetic mod for me. Christmas just happend to come around so I asked my parents for them.


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Thanks for sharing the write up.
It's all too common that seemingly simple mods are far more involved than expected.
Part of that relates to doing it for the first time, & wanting to do it right.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Here the left side. This side was a piece of cake. Just ignore all the goo around the sprocket, I haven't cleaned it yet. :eek:


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i've read throughout these boards that you don't need frame sliders, when you can get these woodcraft rearsets and some handlebar sliders. but if the bike low-sides, won't these stiff aluminum rearsets catch the pavement and cause the bike to flip? wouldn't that cause a high-side and be worse for the bike and rider?

if so, what would be the best solution to protect the frame / engine in case of a drop?
 

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You can dispence with the reservoir entirely. Just use about 2" of the clear tube and plug it at the top. The useage of fluid is so slow it's easy to keep up.

FOG
 
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